Upgraded tools

Slide EDUCATION

2012—: PhD researcher, Architecture and computation, LTH School of Architecture , Lund, Sweden

1999—2005: Architecture, Royal Institute of Technology , Stockholm, Sweden

2004: Architecture , Universität der Künste , Berlin

2002: Architecture , ENSAPLV , Paris, France

1997—1998: Fine arts , Wiks Folkhögskola , Sweden

WORK EXPERIENCE

2010—: Founder, Architect, Designer
   Skåtar Architecture & Design , Berlin, Germany

2020—: Guest professor
   Free University of Bolzano, Italy

2018—: Lecturer
   Anhalt University, Dessau, Germany

2007—2010: Architect, Project manager
   Studio Olafur Eliasson GmbH , Berlin, Germany

2005—2006: Architect
   Tema Architects , Uppsala, Sweden
FREDRIK SKÅTAR
keyboard_arrow_up keyboard_arrow_down SKÅTAR Lectures

keyboard_arrow_left a renaissance of design fundamentals
and a strategy for the future
Upgraded tools

1 a new strategy to remain competitive A new strategy. upgraded tools prefession itself Upgraded tools a discourse on tools is
a discourse on the profession itself
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first VIBRATION MIRROR
Fredrik Skåtar
WAVE TABLE
Fredrik Skåtar
FIBONACCI DRAWINGS
Fredrik Skåtar
FIVE-FOLD TESSELLATIONS
Fredrik Skåtar
Creativity, Efficiency... polarisation2 Polarisation goal-driven1
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polarisation- who are they? Who are they? p skeptics4 p candoism 5b candoism 6c candoism 7c candoism 7d candoism 8c p candoism ai 9b p candoism ai 9c p candoism end keyboard_arrow_left

01 1b 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 keyboard_arrow_left

01 2-prof-exp 7-attitude1 14-fundamentals1 15-fundamentals2 18-fundamentals5 19-fundamentals6 20-system1 23-system4 25-end keyboard_arrow_left

light 1 Light-emitting diodes (LED) are getting smaller and more efficient. Available are a variety of standardized sockets, LED-strips, matrices and bulbs. In the beginning, transformers were large and heavy, now they are so small that they can be integrated into a socket. This opens for new design ideas that are, arguably, not fully explored, neither by the market nor by the industry.

Given that LEDs need less power, rendering the current harmless, we also have more possibilities of conducting electricity. With help from digital fabrication, we could design our own cables, with less or even no isolation. We also have the possibility of 3d-printing our own screw terminals and other details needed for optimization of light design.
The development of new light technologies and materials is rapid.
To what extent are these innovations used by the industry?
Could new digital fabrication methods contribute to new designs?


Pentakis light by Fredrik Skåtar

light 2 There are a wide range of light transmitting materials available; redirecting, diffusing or mirroring light beams. These open for completely new design ideas, e.g. transmitting light from a clear piece of acrylic glass with no visible light source.

Last but not least, digital fabrication offers us vast opportunities for experimenting with geometry and various materials for light shading and form. Throughout the course, a strong emphasis is to maintain a symbiosis between artistic expression, technology and function/application.
Astrohedron by Fredrik Skåtar

light 3 “Fyr” by Hopf, Nordin
www.hopfnordin.se


Design phase 1

● Lectures on innovative light designs throughout design history, from a wide range of scales and applications.

● Lectures on current technologies, materials and examples where these have been applied. Partly carried out by invited guest lecturers.

● Geometry workshops. Students will explore polyhedra, assembly details and kinetic design setups with help from hand sketches, physical models, Rhinoceros3d and Grasshopper algorithmic modelling.

● Rendering workshops. Students will simulate the first sketches using TwinMotion, Keyshot and/or VRay.
light 4 Design phase 2

● Case study drawing workshops. Based on lectures and workshops from design phase 1, students will make case study models of their project application. That is, who is the user and what light conditions and parameters would fit his or her needs?

● Based on the findings from the case study a first sketch is made which is discussed in a group presentation.


Design phase 3

● Investigating parameters. What technology would fit and what materials would be used? The sketches are analysed in order to start the design process.

● Sketching is carried out by hand and/or with physical models. These are precisely analysed and materialised using Rhinoceros and Grasshopper, where the latter offers algorithmically changeable design solutions. Light simulations are carried out parallel to this with help from the student’s chosen rendering software.

● Design phase 3 is concluded with a midterm presentation
“Torch 360°” by Claudia Martinelli & Alessandro Mariotti, Free University of Bolzano 2020

light 5 Design phase 4

● Students explore construction methods. Materials, sockets, conductivity concepts and so forth are explored and continuously discussed with teachers and fellow students.

● Students develop their designs and go deeper into details. The artistic concepts is the driving force which automatically generates research on all technological means available to reach each student’s individual goal.

● Design phase 4 is concluded with a final presentation and an exhibition.
“Light bones”, Andrea Ferri, Free University of Bolzano 2020

LIGHT
— exploring geometry, technology and materials
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OASIS 1 Oasis is a project where one small scale engagement automatically brings about discussion about a larger scale. In order to revitalise a “dead corner” in the city we will create a catalyst of some sort, which has a positive effect locally and city-wide. Such a catalyst can be a sculpture, illumination concepts, temporary structures, a fountain, plants, a shelter, and so forth which affects actions and behaviour among its users.
There are numerous unused and unattractive corners of the city, how can we revitalise these?

Could one architectural element transform a whole square?
Could it bring about new actions and behaviours?

Could the designed situation contribute to a sense of community and well-being?


Corners in Berlin with high development potential

OASIS 2 We will study master plans made by prominent urbanists and try to identify our particular role and our project’s scale as part of such strategies. For example, we will use Secchi+Viganò’s concept of the generic, specific and active policies, that creates conceptual links between a city’s spirit, specific spatial areas and interaction between the built environment and inhabitants.
What is a “dead corner”? - An unused, forgotten square, a public transport building, a concrete parking lot or a dark space behind a public building?

What function should a public square offer? Light? Drinking water? Plants? Furniture?

Could we turn a train station into a cultural hub?


The strategic Spatial Structure Plan for Antwerp (s-RSA, 2006) — collaboration between Italian designers Bernardo Secchi and Paola Viganò and the city services for urban development. Illustration by Fredrik Skåtar
OASIS 3 High Line, New York City, by Diller+Scofidio+Renfro
Design phase 1

● Lectures on public design that promote keywords such as interaction, community, sustainability and nature.

● Lectures on selected urban design strategies. A central concept is Secchi+Viganò’s Strategic Spatial Structure for Antwerp, Belgium, which is arguably well formulated, poetic and innovative as well as widely accessible, not only for professionals.

● Lectures on urban design, policy, culture and politics, putting the question if projects like Oasis could benefit from new types of high-level decision making. As an example, we will study the concept of the Belgian Bouwmeester / city architect. In comparison with other countries, the Belgian city architect arguably has more influence on the future of the city and ultimately the country. He or she creates awareness about the importance of architecture, promotes design diversity and concepts such as slow urbanism, all grounded in academic research.
OASIS 4 Parc de la Villette by Bernard Tschumi. Image by Pline, source.

Design phase 2

● Case study drawing workshop.
Students start to draw on possible design scenarios. We will work with hand sketches, collages and physical models. Continuously, the definitions of a “dead corner” and “revitalisation” are discussed.
The exercise has two main objectives: to define what topic one wants to follow and, based on that topic, start formulating a vision for a new kind of urbanism.

● Simultaneously, students explore the city to find “dead corners” in the urban structure that can be used for the project’s site. They take photos of and make notes about every site they visit. In seminar groups, we discuss the sites selected and try to pinpoint why they need a revitalisation.
OASIS 5 Green temporary installation, Place de la Comédie, Metz, France

Design phase 3

● Investigating the site.
We collect as much info as possible about the site. We make digital drawings based on measurements, we map its current usage and discuss how it could ideally be used, we look at functions available and lacking. Here, factors such as the site’s history, architectural style, infrastructure, and—more emotionally based—its spirit are highly important.

● Refining the idea. Students make site-specific sketches, combining their topic with the site. We work with hand sketches and physical models and ultimately test the ideas with Rhino/Grasshopper which offers algorithmically changeable design solutions. Topics such as material, construction methods, interaction scenarios, user analysis are vital.

● Design phase 3 is concluded with a midterm presentation
OASIS 6 Theaterplein by Secchi+Viganò, Antwerp, belgium

Design phase 4

● Components integrated into Grasshopper are used to create a rough cost calculation and an overview of construction methods.

● Students develop their designs:
        ○ Refining and clearly motivating the form(s) chosen
        ○ defining materials and functions involved
        ○ creating a series of images depicting activity scenarios.

● Design phase 4 is concluded with a final presentation and an exhibition.
How do we prevent vandalism?
Does design, and thus an appearance of care, offer a protection per se?

Prior generations saw concrete as the material of choice for the contemporary, progressive city.
The global urban population is growing rapidly. What do cities need now? More green, and more nature in symbiosis with our urban lives?


OASIS 7 "People, Plant, Places" by Camilla Marani & Virginia Professione, Free University of Bolzano, Italy, 2020.

Student project examples
"Torch 360° street lighting" by Claudia Martinelli & Alessandro Mariotti, Free University of Bolzano, Italy, 2020. "Oase - drinking fountain" by Sarah Troi, Free University of Bolzano, Italy, 2020. Images from Project PD4, Free University of Bolzano 2020.
OASIS
— revitalising forgotten urban corners
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new strategies for chair design SIT investigating precedents algorithmic sculpting SIT - new strategies for chair design - work in progress keyboard_arrow_left

www.skatar.com

1 Design and teaching philosophy Design and teaching philosophy 2 Design and teaching philosophy Design and teaching philosophy idea- and goal-driven design philosophy design philosophy design philosophy design philosophy design philosophy design philosophy spiral1 teaching philosophy How do we complete a design?

- tools, thinking and evaluation are
  interdependent actions

- we need to see these as a synergy
IDEA REFINEMENT
spiral2 teaching philosophy How do we complete a design?

- tools, thinking and evaluation are
  interdependent actions

- we need to see these as a synergy
IDEA REFINEMENT
spiral3 teaching philosophy IDEA REFINEMENT How do we complete a design?

- tools, thinking and evaluation are
  interdependent actions

- we need to see these as a synergy
spiral4 teaching philosophy IDEA REFINEMENT How do we complete a design?

- tools, thinking and evaluation are
  interdependent actions

- we need to see these as a synergy
spiral5 teaching philosophy Goals:

- to gain design process experience

- to train skills

- to build “mental skills library”
IDEA REFINEMENT
spiral6 teaching philosophy IDEA REFINEMENT Goals:

- to gain design process experience

- to train skills

- to build “mental skills library”
spiral7 teaching philosophy IDEA REFINEMENT Goals:

- to gain design process experience

- to train skills

- to build “mental skills library”
spiral8 teaching philosophy IDEA REFINEMENT Goals:

- to gain design process experience

- to train skills

- to build “mental skills library”
teaching philosophy Reciprocity between

- hand and mind

- theory and practice

- words and form
STRATEGY
teaching philosophy Working method

- geometry research

- sketching by hand and with software

- constructing one's own idea
STRATEGY
teaching philosophy Software skills

- automatically gaining knowledge   through individual motivation

- creating “parametric tools”

- create a “mental library” of methods
STRATEGY
teaching philosophy INSIGHT after having gained design-process experience:

- digital tools are not a stand-alone subject.

- digital tools are part of all other tools and
  their underlying concepts derive from history.
student works Andrea Ferri students1 student works students2 student works student works Camilla Marani, Virginia Professione students4 student works Claudia Martinelli, Alessandro Mariotti
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